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  • Trump tells Netanyahu he would recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital

    Israel's Prime Minister Netanyahu departs after meeting with Republican presidential nominee Trump at Trump Tower in New YorkBy Alana Wise WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump on Sunday told Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that if elected, the United States would recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, the campaign said, marking a potential dramatic shift in U.S. policy. During the meeting that lasted more than an hour at Trump Tower in New York, Trump told Netanyahu that under his administration, the United States would "recognize Jerusalem as the undivided capital of the State of Israel." While Israel calls Jerusalem its capital, few other countries accept that, including the United States.




  • U.S., Russia trade blows over Syria as warplanes pound Aleppo

    A man waters his plants in front of damaged buildings in the rebel-held Douma neighbourhood of DamascusBy Michelle Nichols and Suleiman Al-Khalidi UNITED NATIONS/AMMAN (Reuters) - The United States accused Russia of "barbarism" in Syria on Sunday as warplanes supporting Syrian government forces pounded Aleppo and Moscow said ending the civil war was almost "impossible". A diplomatic solution to the fighting looked unlikely as U.S. and Russian diplomats disagreed at a U.N. Security Council meeting called to discuss the violence, which has escalated since a ceasefire collapsed last week. Rebels, who are battling President Bashar al-Assad's forces for control of Aleppo, said any peace process would be futile unless the "scorched earth bombing" stopped immediately.




  • U.S. network of Turkish cleric facing pressure as those at home seek help

    U.S. based cleric Fethullah Gulen at his home in Saylorsburg, PennsylvaniaBy Julia Harte and Matt Spetalnick WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A network of more than 150 U.S. charter schools linked to followers of Fethullah Gulen, the Pennsylvania-based Muslim cleric the Turkish government blames for instigating July’s failed coup, has come under growing financial and legal strain, according to school officials, current and former members of Gulen’s movement, and public records reviewed by Reuters. The publicly financed schools, a key source of jobs and business opportunities for U.S. members of Gulen’s global movement, have sharply slowed their expansion in recent years, public records show. The slowdown comes amid a series of government probes in more than a dozen states into allegations ranging from misuse of taxpayer funds to visa fraud.




  • Squeezing North Korea: old friends take steps to isolate regime

    Trucks cross Friendship Bridge from China's Dandong, Liaoning province, to North Korea's SinuijuBy Ju-min Park and Tony Munroe SEOUL (Reuters) - From kicking out North Korean workers and ending visa-free travel for its citizens, to stripping flags of convenience from its ships, Cold War-era allies from Poland to Mongolia are taking measures to squeeze the isolated country. More such moves, with prodding from South Korea and the United States, are expected after North Korea recently defied U.N. resolutions to conduct its fifth nuclear test. North Korea's limited global links leave most countries with few targets for penalizing the regime on their own.




  • Houthi official in Yemen offers border truce, amnesty

    A man inspects the damage in a house after a Saudi-led air strike in old Sanaa cityA top official in Yemen's armed Houthi movement on Sunday offered to stop attacks on Saudi Arabia and an amnesty for Yemeni fighters opposing the group if the kingdom stopped air strikes and lifted a near blockade on the country. The move falls short of demands by Yemen's government and their backers in Saudi Arabia, but offers rare hope for a pause to 18 months of fighting which has killed at least 10,000 people and pushed impoverished Yemen toward famine. "(In exchange for) stopping the aggression against our country by land, sea and air, stopping the air strikes and lifting the siege imposed on our country, in return (we will)stop combat operations on the border," Saleh al-Samad, the chief of a Houthi-backed political council, said in a speech.




  • Colombia to sign peace with Marxist rebels, ending 52-year war

    Colombia's President Santos gestures during a news conference in CartagenaBy Helen Murphy and Luis Jaime Acosta CARTAGENA, Colombia (Reuters) - Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos and Marxist rebel leader Timochenko will sign a deal on Monday ending a half-century war that killed a quarter of a million people, stymied the economy and made Colombia a byword for violence. After four years of negotiations in Havana, Santos, 65, and Timochenko, a nom de guerre for the 57-year-old revolutionary, will shake hands for the first time on Colombian soil in front of world leaders. Some 2,500 foreign and local dignitaries will attend the ceremony in the colonial city of Cartagena, where huge billboards call on Colombians to accept the peace plan.




  • Bosnian Serbs overwhelmingly vote to keep disputed holiday

    Bosnian Serb Milorad Dodik, President of the Bosnian Serb region of Republic of Srpska, greets supporters during celebrations after the result of the referendum in the Bosnian town of Pale, Bosnia, on Sunday Sept. 25, 2016. Sunday's vote asks residents of Republika Srpska whether to maintain a national holiday on Jan. 9, despite a ruling of Bosnia's constitutional court that the date discriminates against non-Serbs. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Bosnian Serbs have voted overwhelmingly in favor of keeping a disputed holiday that a constitutional court had said discriminates against non-Serbs.




  • Hollande says Calais migrant camp to be fully, definitely shut

    French President Francois Hollande delivers a speech during a ceremony to pay respects to the Harkis, at the Hotel des Invalides in ParisFrance will dismantle the squalid shanty town where thousands of migrants live in the northern port city of Calais and expects Britain - where many of the migrants ultimately want to go - to play its part in managing the situation, France's President Francois Hollande said on Monday. "The situation is unacceptable and everyone here knows it," Hollande said on a visit to the northern city, where in the region of 10,000 migrants live in a makeshift camp known at the Jungle. "We must dismantle the camp completely and definitively." Hollande delivered a stern message too to Britain, saying he expected London to fully honor agreements on managing a flow of migrants who mostly flock to Calais from war zones likely Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq in the hope of reaching Britain by boat, train or in stowed away in the back of cargo trucks.




  • PKK attack on military vehicle in Turkey: 2 killed, 8 hurt
    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey's state-run news agency says Kurdish rebels have detonated a roadside bomb in southeast Turkey, killing two security force members and wounding eight others.

  • French president vows to shut down Calais camp this year

    FILE- In this Tuesday, August 23, 2016 file photo, migrants queue to receive their daily food distribution in a makeshift camp in Calais, northern France. French President Francois Hollande on Saturday Sept. 24, confirmed plans to close the squalid Calais migrant camp known as "the Jungle," saying he hopes authorities can relocate as many as 9,000 migrants to reception centers across France in the coming weeks. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler, File)CALAIS, France (AP) — French President Francois Hollande says the migrant camp in Calais must be fully dismantled by the end of the year.




  • India skittle New Zealand for victory in 500th Test

    New Zealand's Luke Ronchi (R) watches as India's Ravichandran Ashwin bowls during the fourth day of the first TestIndia's 500th Test match ended in victory celebrations Monday as they romped to a 197-run triumph in their series opener against New Zealand, with Ravichandran Ashwin taking six wickets. New Zealand resumed their second innings on 93 for four at the start of the fifth and final day in pursuit of an unlikely 434-run victory target, but were bowled out shortly after lunch for 236. Ashwin, who recorded his 19th five-wicket haul in Tests, and left-arm spinner Ravindra Jadeja shared 16 wickets between them in the match to flatten the New Zealand batting at Kanpur's Green Park.




  • Top Asian News 8:17 a.m. GMT
    Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said last week that he will invite the U.N. chief and European Union officials to investigate his bloody anti-drug crackdown, but only if he can question them in public afterward to prove their human rights concerns are baseless. Duterte disclosed the offer in a speech in which he again lashed out at critics of his crackdown, including President Barack Obama and European countries. More than 3,000 suspected drug dealers and users have been killed since July and more than 600,000 others have surrendered for fear of being killed in Duterte's crackdown. In other images from the Asia-Pacific region last week, North Korea held an air festival featuring sky diving, air force demonstrations and lots of beer to promote a newly renovated and upgraded airport in the coastal city of Wonsan, an area where it hopes to draw more foreign tourists.

  • Kvitova safely through as retirements hit Wuhan

    Petra Kvitova beat Latvian Jelena Ostapenko 6-3, 6-1 in Wuhan on September 26, 2016Double Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova beat Latvian Jelena Ostapenko as the WTA Wuhan Open was hit by a wave of retirements Monday. Afterwards, I was just more relaxed and more confident," Kvitova told reporters. Briton Heather Watson, Anastasija Sevastova of Latvia and Russian Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova all retired from their first-round matches Monday -- taking the tally of retirements to five on just the second day of the hard court event which had already been hit by the withdrawal of former number one Serena Williams.




  • Hamburg hires Markus Gisdol as coach

    FILE - In this May 16, 2015 file photo Hamburg's coach Bruno Labbadia arrives for the German first division Bundesliga soccer match between VfB Stuttgart and Hamburger SV at the Mercedes Benz Arena in Stuttgart, Germany. Hamburger SV said Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016 that the club suspended Labbadia following a 0-1 loss to FC Bayern Munich the day before. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader, file)HAMBURG, Germany (AP) — Hamburger SV has hired Markus Gisdol as coach, replacing Bruno Labbadia.




  • Ashwin helps India to 197-run win over NZ in its 500th test

    India's Virat Kohli, second left, celebrates the wicket of New Zealand's BJ Watling with bowler Mohamed Shami, left, on the fifth day of their first cricket test match against India, at Green Park Stadium in Kanpur, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. On the right is Indian cricketer Ravindra Jadeja. (AP Photo/ Tsering Topgyal)KANPUR, India (AP) — India celebrated its 500th test with a 197-run win over New Zealand on Monday, with Ravi Ashwin claiming six second-innings wickets to hasten victory in the series-opening match.




  • Shandong final-whistle fracas mars celebrations

    Shandong Luneng's Graziano Pelle (L) fights for the ball with FC Seoul player Kwak Tae-Hwi during an AFC Champions League match in Seoul, on August 24, 2016Italy striker Graziano Pelle's Shandong Luneng were involved in a post-match fracas Sunday as security guards tried to prevent them celebrating victory with their fans. The rumpus came at the end of Shandong Luneng's 2-1 victory against Beijing Guoan in the Chinese Super League at Beijing’s Workers’ Stadium. The final whistle prompted bizarre scenes as Shandong’s Chinese international goalkeeper Wang Dalei jumped over advertising hoardings and clashed repeatedly with several security officers as he tried to celebrate in front of his team's fans.




  • Arnold Palmer dies at 87, made golf popular for masses

    File-This jan. 28, 1962, file photo shows Arnold Palmer concentrating on his next move during the Lucky International Open at San Francisco's Harding Park. Palmer, who made golf popular for the masses with his hard-charging style, incomparable charisma and a personal touch that made him known throughout the golf world as "The King," died Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, in Pittsburgh. He was 87. (AP Photo, File)Arnold Palmer charged across the golf course and into America's living rooms with a go-for-broke style that made a country club sport popular for the everyman. At ease with presidents and the public, he was on a first-name basis with both.




  • Russia under fire at UN as air strikes pound Syria's Aleppo

    A tractor clears the rubble following Syrian govermnet forces' airstrikes in the rebel held neighborhood of Tariq a-Bab in AleppoThe US accused Moscow of "barbarism" over the worsening carnage in Aleppo, as Syrian and Russian warplanes pounded the city in one of the heaviest bombing raids of the five-year war. At an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council to demand Russia rein in its ally, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, and halt intense air strikes, Moscow and Damascus were repeatedly accused of war crimes. "What Russia is sponsoring and doing is not counter-terrorism.




  • World's largest radio telescope starts operating in China

    The Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST)in operation in Pingtang, in southwestern China's Guizhou province on September 25, 2016The world's largest radio telescope began operating in southwestern China Sunday, a project Beijing says will help humanity search for alien life. The Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST), nestled between hills in the mountainous region of Guizhou, began working around noon, the official Xinhua news agency reported. Built at a cost of 1.2 billion yuan ($180 million), the telescope dwarfs the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico as the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, with twice the sensitivity and a reflector as large as 30 football fields, it said.




  • Parents of Mexico's missing students live in classrooms

    Nicanora Garcia, mother of missing student Saul Bruno Garcia, stands in a classroom turned dormitory at the Raul Isidro Burgos rural teachers college in Ayotzinapa, Guerrero state, Mexico on September 21, 2016They turned classrooms at their children's college into dormitories, sleeping on the floor, but parents of 43 Mexican students missing since 2014 won't rest until they find them. Around 20 parents have made the teacher training college in Ayotzinapa, southern Guerrero state, their home since September 27, 2014, the day after their sons vanished from the city of Iguala. The night before, dozens of young men from the school had gone to Iguala to seize buses for a protest in Mexico City, but they were attacked by local police.




  • Azerbaijan votes on presidential term extension
    BAKU, Azerbaijan (AP) — Amid international criticism, proposed constitutional changes that would extend the president's term and increase the office's power have come before Azerbaijan's voters in a referendum.

  • UN rights expert plans to probe Philippine killings

    Rodrigo Duterte won Philippine presidential election in a landslide in May 2016 after promising to kill 100,000 criminals as part of a campaign against illegal drugsA United Nations rights rapporteur told AFP on Monday she intended to visit the Philippines to investigate President Rodrigo Duterte's deadly war on crime, but was seeking security guarantees for people she planned to speak with. While the government has yet to issue formal invitations, the UN rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, Agnes Callamard, said she would solicit one. "I welcome the reports recently (conveyed) through the media that the president and government of the Philippines will invite a UN mission to investigate the alleged extrajudicial executions," Callamard said in a statement emailed to AFP.




  • Japan vows to watch Chinese warplane activity closely
    TOKYO (AP) — Japan's top government spokesman warned China on Monday against expanding its military activity to the skies over disputed East China Sea islands after eight Chinese warplanes flew near the area over the weekend.

  • Asian stocks mostly lower ahead of US presidential debate
    TOKYO (AP) — Asian shares were mostly lower Monday as market attention turned from action from central banks to the U.S. presidential race, with a closely watched debate upcoming.

  • Spanish police arrest two accused of supporting Islamist militants
    Spanish police have arrested two Moroccan men accused of supporting Islamist militants and potentially planning an attack on European soil, the Interior Ministry said on Monday. The ministry said one of the accused had planned on joining the Islamic State group in Syria and had traveled to the country's border with Turkey to meet a member of the organization to be trained before returning to Europe to take part in an attack. The man was arrested by Turkish police before crossing the border and was returned to Spain once released where he continued efforts to join the militant group, the ministry said.

  • In South Korea, the crowd goes wild for competitive gaming

    In this Aug. 20, 2016, photo, two models in game costume pose for fans before the 2016 Coca-Cola League of Legend Summer Final match between Rox Tigers and KT Rolster at Jamsil gymnasium in Seoul, South Korea. South Korea started the e-sports industry in the early 2000s, and it continues to be a world leader in competitive gaming. There are not only professional video game players, but also broadcasting channels and professional leagues for different kinds of games. South Koreans can easily watch professional gamers playing on both television and the internet. (AP Photo/Jungho Choi)SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea started the e-sports industry in the early 2000s, and it continues to be a world leader in competitive gaming. There are not only professional video game players, but also broadcasting channels and professional leagues for different kinds of games. South Koreans can easily watch professional gamers playing on both television and the internet.




  • Teenage surfer stable after shark attack at Australian beach
    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — A teenage surfer was in stable condition after he was bitten by a shark Monday at the same Australian beach where a Japanese surfer was fatally mauled last year, officials said.

  • Philippines reports first Zika pregnancy case

    Zika-infected pregnant women can give birth to babies with microcephaly, a deformation marked by abnormally small brains and headsThe Philippines on Monday reported its first known case of a pregnant woman infected with the Zika virus that threatens unborn babies, as authorities warned people to avoid mosquitos. Health Secretary Paulyn Ubial said 12 cases of Zika had been detected across the Philippines this month, including a 22-year-old woman from the central island of Cebu who is 19 weeks' pregnant with her first child. Zika-infected pregnant women can give birth to babies with microcephaly, a deformation marked by abnormally small brains and heads.




  • India on verge of victory in landmark 500th Test

    India's Virat Kohli (L) and Ravindra Jadeja (R) celebrate as Mohammed Shami (C) successfully appeals for a LBW decision against New Zealand's B. J. WatlingIndia closed in on victory Monday in the first Test against New Zealand, with the visitors reeling at 205 for seven at lunch on the final day despite half-centuries from Luke Ronchi and Mitchell Santner. The Black Caps, who resumed on 93 for four after being set an unlikely 434 for victory, lost three more wickets during another tough session at Kanpur's Green Park stadium which is hosting India's 500th Test. Mitchell Santner on 57 and Ish Sodhi on two were battling against a persistent Indian bowling attack when the players broke for lunch.




  • NHC says 50 percent chance of cyclone near Windward Islands
    (Reuters) - A large, low-pressure area located about 1,150 miles east-southeast of the Windward Islands has a 50 percent chance of developing into a cyclone in the next 48 hours, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said on Monday. A tropical depression is likely to form later this week while the low moves westward to west-northwestward at 15 to 20 miles per hour, the Miami-based weather forecaster said. (Reporting by Swati Verma in Bengaluru; Editing by Sunil Nair)

  • A Syrian refugee balances life in Germany with chaos at home

    In this photo taken Monday, Aug. 15, 2016, Mohammed al-Haj makes coffee in his home in Saarbruecken, Germany. Al-Haj, a native of the city of Aleppo, Syria's one-time economic capital that now lies in ruins, came to the western German state of Saarland in September 2015 to benefit from its swift processing of migrants. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)SAARBRUECKEN, Germany (AP) — At the intersection, Mohammed al-Haj waited patiently for the "green man." No cars were coming, no policemen watching. Back home in Syria, he wouldn't hesitate.




  • Building a life in Germany, a Syrian watches war at home

    In this photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016, through a window with reflections Mohammed al-Haj learns German in his home in Saarbruecken, Germany. Al-Haj, a native of the city of Aleppo, Syria's one-time economic capital that now lies in ruins, came to the western German state of Saarland in September 2015 to benefit from its swift processing of migrants. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)SAARBRUECKEN, Germany (AP) — At the intersection, Mohammed al-Haj waited patiently for the "green man." It seemed a bit silly: No cars were coming, no policemen watching. Back home in Syria, he wouldn't hesitate.




  • Moderate quakes rattle Japan; no injuries or damage reported
    TOKYO (AP) — A pair of moderate earthquakes rattled northern and southern Japan on Monday, but there were no immediate reports of injuries or damage, and there was no danger of a tsunami.

  • Powerful quake rattles Japan's southern island of Okinawa
    TOKYO (AP) — An earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 5.7 has rattled Okinawa and other southern Japanese islands, but there was no danger of a tsunami.

  • Jeetan Patel recalled to New Zealand cricket team
    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Off-spinner Jeetan Patel has been recalled to the New Zealand cricket team after a three-year absence as a replacement for injured Mark Craig, who has been ruled out of the remainder of the test series against India.

  • Reaction to Arnold Palmer's death Sunday

    FILE - In this April 12, 1964 file photo, Arnold Palmer, right, slips into his green jacket with help from Jack Nicklaus after winning the Masters golf championship, in Augusta, Ga. Palmer, who made golf popular for the masses with his hard-charging style, incomparable charisma and a personal touch that made him known throughout the golf world as "The King," died Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, in Pittsburgh. He was 87. (AP Photo/File)Reaction to golf great Arnold Palmer's death Sunday at age 87 in Pittsburgh:




  • AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

    In this Friday, Sept. 23, 2016 photo, a police SWAT member stands guard as police operatives examine the scene where two bodies lay on a road after being killed in a police drug "buy-bust" operation before dawn in Pasig city, east of Manila, Philippines. Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said on Thursday he will invite the U.N. chief and European Union officials to investigate his bloody anti-drug crackdown, but only if he can question them in public afterward to prove their human rights concerns are baseless. More than 3,000 suspected drug dealers and users have been killed since July and more than 600,000 others have surrendered for fear of being killed in Duterte's crackdown. Despite growing alarm, Duterte said he won't stop the campaign.(AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said last week that he will invite the U.N. chief and European Union officials to investigate his bloody anti-drug crackdown, but only if he can question them in public afterward to prove their human rights concerns are baseless. Duterte disclosed the offer in a speech in which he again lashed out at critics of his crackdown, including President Barack Obama and European countries. More than 3,000 suspected drug dealers and users have been killed since July and more than 600,000 others have surrendered for fear of being killed in Duterte's crackdown.




  • A league of their own: Rohingya footballers tackle prejudice in Malaysia

    A group of young refugees from the Rohingya Football Club pose for a photo before a match in Kuala LumpurBy Beh Lih Yi KUALA LUMPUR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Racing from one end of the football pitch to another, the players in bright yellow and pink jerseys pass the ball between them, weaving around their opponents, tackling each other and occasionally, committing a foul. The players are young refugees from the Rohingya Muslim minority in predominantly Buddhist Myanmar, who are trying to tackle the prejudices they face in society in one of the few arenas they truly feel equal. For Mohammed Farouque, whose perilous journey to Malaysia included a journey on a crowded boat and a stay in people-smuggling camp in the jungle, the sense of liberation is something new.




  • Southern Japan jolted by 5.7 magnitude quake
    Japan's southern Okinawa island and a chain of neighboring islands were shaken on Monday by an earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 5.7, but no tsunami warning was issued and there were no immediate reports of damage or injury. Earthquakes are common in Japan, one of the world's most seismically active areas. On March 11, 2011, the northeast coast was struck by a magnitude 9 earthquake, the strongest quake in Japan on record, and a massive tsunami.

  • FIFA bans Qatari official from Asian vote

    Allegations of vote-buying have dogged the awarding of the FIFA 2018 World Cup to Russia and the 2022 edition to QatarWorld football body FIFA has banned a senior Qatari official from running in elections for a seat on its new-look council over an investigation. Scandal-plagued FIFA's ethics committee last month recommended a two-and-a-half-year ban from the game for Saoud Al-Mohannadi, vice-president of the Qatar Football Association, for refusing to cooperate with an inquiry. FIFA has not revealed the subject of the inquiry, but it is not connected with the 2022 World Cup, which Qatar will host.





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