Students for Democracy - uncensored international political forums
  StudentsforDemocracy home     StudentsforDemocracy - forums     StudentsforDemocracy - guestbook  
Register   Login  
 Main Menu

Warning: This text and the email address is not visible in a browser! Do not ever send any emails to:
dgtuuwti@contact.studentsfordemocracy.org


 Latest Picture


 SfD Top Posters
No avatar
EngineerSoldier (12240)

SfD's Top-Poster #2
odin (9239)

No avatar
tude dog (7646)

SfD's Top-Poster #4
twiw (7595)

SfD's Top-Poster #5
headrock (6554)


 SfD Site Stats
People Online:  12
Memberships: 1089

Newest Members:
Odecalia (2/28/2017)
clarataylor5 (2/15/2017)
fifa17bella (1/16/2017)
olgajack (1/8/2017)
fifa17sara (1/2/2017)

 Please donate!
Newest Link from Studentfordemocracys Link Page

Save the children

War child charity 

 
StudentsforDemocracy World News

Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines 
  • Delay on GOP health care vote: Bill 'too conservative' and 'not conservative enough'

    Delay on GOP health care vote: Bill 'too conservative' and 'not conservative enough'House Speaker Paul Ryan thought he had found the “sweet spot” in the Republican health care plan – a bill that would appeal to both GOP conservatives and moderates. Despite intense coordination with the White House and the president’s personal involvement on the GOP bill to repeal and replace Obamacare, the speaker was forced to delay the bill for lack of Republican votes. If Speaker Ryan is unable to forge a compromise that will bring him to victory, it will be a huge blow to the Republican agenda, to his speakership, and to President Trump.




  • Responsible fatherhood: He’s been a key voice in the national conversation

    Responsible fatherhood: He’s been a key voice in the national conversationWhile the certificate represents the end of a 17-year drug addiction marked by countless court appearances and several stints behind bars, it is also emblematic of the type of progress and improvement that he works to bring out in others who live in Baltimore. Jones is founder and president of the Center for Urban Families (CFUF), established in 1999 with the objective of empowering low-income families through programs designed to help wage earners contribute to their families and to help men fulfill their roles as fathers. There are dozens of outstanding warrants, high rates of reentry among those released from correctional facilities, and a tally of more than $26 million in collective child-support arrears, he notes.




  • Who's the greatest leader in the world? Chicago Cubs's Theo Epstein

    Who's the greatest leader in the world? Chicago Cubs's Theo EpsteinFor readers who don’t follow the Sox or the Cubs – which both recently claimed their first World Series wins in living memory under Mr. Epstein’s watch – Fortune’s decision will likely come as a surprise.




  • Russia set to unveil the world's newest print encyclopedia – and its last?

    Russia set to unveil the world's newest print encyclopedia – and its last?Initiated by a decree of Vladimir Putin in 2003, the massive 36-volume Great Russian Encyclopedia (GRE) was intended – as encyclopedias tend to be – as a compendium of all fundamental knowledge, a benchmark of truth, and, more subtly, a repudiation of the ideologically-tinged world view of its famous predecessor, The Great Soviet Encyclopedia. Recommended: Sochi, Soviets, and czars: How much do you know about Russia? "Russia needed a new encyclopedia that reflects modern society and consciousness, so this one is not a continuation of its Soviet predecessor," Mr. Kravets says.




  • Former Russian lawmaker and Moscow critic gunned down in Ukraine

    Former Russian lawmaker and Moscow critic gunned down in UkraineA former member of the Russian Duma who had moved to Ukraine was shot and killed in Kiev on Thursday, sparking allegations that the murder was politically motivated. Denis Voronenkov was shot dead outside the upscale Premier Palace hotel in the Ukrainian capital. Ukraine is currently investigating the incident.




  • Why has Jackson, Miss., been labeled 'the fattest city' in the US?

    Why has Jackson, Miss., been labeled 'the fattest city' in the US?According to personal finance website WalletHub, Jackson, Miss., is the fattest city in America. WalletHub released its ranking of the 2017 Fattest Cities in America list on Wednesday. The list was based on analysis of the 100 most populous cities in the United States with regard to various weight-related factors to create the rankings.




  • Martin McGuinness leaves behind a complicated legacy, uncertain future

    Martin McGuinness leaves behind a complicated legacy, uncertain futureMartin McGuinness, a former Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) leader and politician, will be laid to rest on Thursday in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Among them were many dignitaries, including former US President Bill Clinton. Recommended: Forget Irish cliches: How much do you really know about Ireland?




  • US-Israeli teen arrested in connection with threats to Jewish community centers

    US-Israeli teen arrested in connection with threats to Jewish community centersThree months after Jewish community centers began receiving bomb threats, police have arrested the man they say is behind the hoax. On Thursday, police in Israel arrested a man they believe threatened Jewish institutions in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, as well as within Israel. The teenage suspect, who is reported to be Jewish, holds dual US and Israeli citizenship and was found unfit for compulsory military service in Israel.




  • UN urges Sri Lanka to investigate civil war atrocities

    UN urges Sri Lanka to investigate civil war atrocitiesSpeaking to the UN Human Rights Council, Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, reported on the situation in Sri Lanka still dealing with the aftermath of a 26-year civil war that ended in 2009.




  • London attack: how Europe has overcome terror campaigns before

    London attack: how Europe has overcome terror campaigns beforeThe attack outside the Houses of Parliament, which left four people dead and dozens injured, was the latest in a string of low-tech, high-profile terrorist incidents in Europe. Good police and intelligence work can head off such incidents and save lives, as Europe’s recent history has shown. The graver threat – that terrorist attacks undermine Western societies by spurring anti-Muslim hatred and divisions – is harder, though not impossible, to confront.




  • In Exxon climate change probe, how will the ‘lost emails’ be recovered?

    In Exxon climate change probe, how will the ‘lost emails’ be recovered?A New York state judge has ordered ExxonMobil to work with state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman to recover lost emails, part of an ongoing climate change probe of the company. According to the attorney general, the account was actually an email alias for Rex Tillerson, then the chief executive of the corporation (Mr. Tillerson's middle name is Wayne). Currently, Tillerson is the US secretary of State, a fact which has raised the stakes of the investigation considerably.




  • Rick Perry questions win of first openly gay student president at Texas A&M

    Rick Perry questions win of first openly gay student president at Texas A&MEarlier this month, Texas A&M student Bobby Brooks was elected student body president, making him the first openly gay student to hold the position. At a school that has historically been one of the most LGBT-unfriendly schools in the nation, Mr. Brooks’s election gave some a reason to celebrate. One of Brooks's rivals, Robert McIntosh, had the lead when the votes were first counted.




  • In swift response to London terror attack, eight suspects arrested as Parliament resumes

    In swift response to London terror attack, eight suspects arrested as Parliament resumesAs Londoners seek to resume business as usual, a police investigation of Wednesday’s attack continues. In the attack, a man driving an SUV plowed into a crowd of pedestrians on Westminster Bridge, killing two people and injuring approximately 30, police indicated. The attacker then fatally stabbed a police officer on Parliament’s grounds before being shot by police.




  • Tim Allen, conservatives in Hollywood, and Nazi Germany

    Tim Allen, conservatives in Hollywood, and Nazi GermanyTim Allen feels it’s so tough to be a conservative in Hollywood, it’s like living in Nazi Germany. “Tim, have you lost your mind?” Steven Goldstein, the executive director of organization, said in a statement.




  • Can you tally up world progress?

    Can you tally up world progress?When the cold war ended a quarter century ago, and with it the division of the world into two “camps,” the United Nations decided to start measuring the progress of humanity as a whole. The hope behind such alternative indicators is that an attempt to measure something might help reveal what causes it or could push it along.




  • After ISIS: For Iraqis, reconciliation in Mosul will be challenging, and vital

    After ISIS: For Iraqis, reconciliation in Mosul will be challenging, and vitalThe colonel is a quintessential Iraqi military man: shaved head, bushy black mustache, and very proud of how the Iraqi Army has rebuilt and “proved it is professional” in the fight to oust the Islamic State from Mosul. Like many in Iraq, the colonel is wary that the challenges of reconciliation and winning the peace in Mosul and across the complex ethnic mosaic of Nineveh Province will be harder than winning the war. Recommended: How much do you know about the Islamic State?




  • ‘Dare to be tender’: One year after attack, Belgian king urges kindness

    ‘Dare to be tender’: One year after attack, Belgian king urges kindnessBrussels on Wednesday marked the first anniversary of suicide bombings that killed 32 people at the airport and subway, with ceremonies timed with the blasts and the dedication of a new memorial. Recommended: How much do you know about Islam and violence? "Above all, let us dare to be tender," he said, at the unveiling of a new monument to all the victims near the headquarters of the European Union in Brussels’ European Quarter.




  • What we know about Trump team Russia links – and why that matters

    What we know about Trump team Russia links – and why that mattersPaul Manafort was Donald Trump’s campaign manager for months in 2016. Mr. Manafort “played a very limited role for a very limited amount of time,” White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Monday at his daily briefing. Ditto longtime Trump associate Roger Stone and former foreign policy adviser Carter Page.




  • Former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort received millions to promote Putin

    Former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort received millions to promote PutinFormer Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort resigned in August, amid swirling rumors of his connections to foreign governments, including Russia. A new Associated Press investigation uncovered ties between Mr. Manafort and Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska dating back to 2005. In a confidential strategy plan, Manafort told Mr. Deripaska that he could influence politics, business, and media across the United States, Europe, and former Soviet states for the benefit of Russia.




  • In unanimous decision, Supreme Court raises bar for special education

    In unanimous decision, Supreme Court raises bar for special educationOn Wednesday, the US Supreme Court unanimously ruled in favor of two parents of an autistic son, finding that his Colorado school district had failed to provide him with a "free and appropriate public education."




  • Calif. class action suit alleges 'unfair competition' with Ivanka Trump brand

    Calif. class action suit alleges 'unfair competition' with Ivanka Trump brandA small, San Francisco boutique almost 3,000 miles away from Ivanka Trump’s office in the White House might not seem like a business that would find itself entangled with the first daughter’s multi-million dollar fashion brand. In a class action lawsuit filed in San Francisco Superior Court last week, the 40-year-old, family-owned Modern Appealing Clothing argues that unethical promotion of the Ivanka Trump brand by the current administration has violated the US Constitution and a California statute protecting businesses against unfair competition.




  • Data didn't change tech's frat-boy culture. Will storytelling?

    Data didn't change tech's frat-boy culture. Will storytelling?An engineer at Lever – a recruitment software startup in San Francisco – her role includes reaching out to co-workers about life in the tech industry. Now, firms like Lever are turning to anecdotes and personal exchanges as bases for developing empathy – and building inclusive cultures from the ground up.




  • Supreme Court tightens restrictions on presidential appointments

    Supreme Court tightens restrictions on presidential appointmentsWhen the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ruled that SW General, Inc. had violated federal labor law, the Scottsdale, Ariz., ambulance firm questioned whether the NLRB’s acting general counsel, Lafe Solomon, had authority to handle the case. On Wednesday, the US Supreme Court sided with SW General, ruling 6-2 that Mr. Solomon’s 2011 nomination by then-President Barack Obama violated the 1998 Federal Vacancies Reform Act, rendering Solomon’s actions against SW General null and void. Legal analysts agree that this ruling could narrow the president’s nominating authority.




  • What is known so far about terrorist attack outside London's Parliament

    What is known so far about terrorist attack outside London's ParliamentAt least 20 people were injured and at least four people killed in what officials are saying was a terrorist attack that took place near the British Parliament building in London Wednesday afternoon. Others reported that a vehicle was seen on the nearby Westminster Bridge running over several pedestrians. A woman was also reportedly taken out of the river near the Westminster bridge, injured but alive.




  • Germany set to deport native-born potential terrorists

    Germany set to deport native-born potential terroristsIn a move without precedent in German history, the country will soon deport two German-born men accused of having discussed terrorist activity. On Tuesday, the Federal Administrative Court in Leipzig threw out a case saying that the men, one an Algerian national and the other a Nigerian citizen, should not be deported because there was no proof they had committed a serious offense. In so doing, it cleared the way for deportations that the state government of Lower Saxony ordered last month, when it described the pair as a threat to national security.




  • US infant mortality rate declines, but disparities remain

    US infant mortality rate declines, but disparities remainThe rate of infant deaths in the United States has improved, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a study released on Tuesday. The infant mortality rate dropped 15 percent over the past decade, from a record high 6.86 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2005 to 5.82 in 2014, data show. While the new report indicates a promising development in the country’s public health, commentators say the United States has a long way to go to catch up peer nations. "I think there was a public health push in the past decade to figure out ways to lower this rate, and it has made an impact," report author T.J. Mathews, a demographer at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, told CNN on Tuesday.




  • Gorsuch hearings: Should agencies – or courts – decide the law?

    Gorsuch hearings: Should agencies – or courts – decide the law?There are several elephants in the room where senators are grilling Judge Neil Gorsuch this week. One of those proverbial pachyderms was present courtesy of the aspiring Supreme Court justice. “There’s an elephant in the room with us today,” Judge Gorsuch wrote in a 2016 concurrence that featured prominently in 11 hours of questioning Tuesday from members of the Senate Judiciary Committee.




  • What is Facebook's responsibility when people broadcast crimes?

    What is Facebook's responsibility when people broadcast crimes?The apparent sexual assault of a Chicago teenager, broadcast on Facebook Live, has reignited debate about the feature and Facebook’s responsibility to address crimes. It was not until Monday, however, that her family learned that an apparent sexual assault on the girl had been broadcast on Facebook Live. None of the 40 viewers had reported the incident through Facebook’s content-review system, but a teenager mentioned the video to Reginald King, one of the girl’s relatives.




  • North Korea missile launch toward S. Korea failed. How often does that happen?

    North Korea missile launch toward S. Korea failed. How often does that happen?The missile, launched from the eastern coastal town of Wonsan, “[appeared] to have exploded within seconds of launch,” the US Pacific Command said in a statement. American officials had been aware of the planned launch for several days, as they observed a rocket being moved and VIP seating being assembled in Wonsan, they told the Associated Press on Tuesday. The launch failure comes as the United States and South Korea engage in their annual “Foal Eagle” joint military exercises, which typically provoke a strong response from the North.




  • How Washington evaluates software vulnerabilities

    How Washington evaluates software vulnerabilitiesIn August, the National Security Agency (NSA) found itself scrambling to figure out how a group dubbed the Shadow Brokers obtained the agency’s alleged hacking tools, some of which they posted online and others they offered to the highest bidder. The startling breach not only revealed that the NSA seemed to rely on previously unknown security vulnerabilities – called zero-days – in Cisco and Fortinet commercial software to carry out digital espionage campaigns, it also exposed NSA tactics to foreign adversaries. It remains unclear whether the NSA used these tools for surveillance operations, but it appears the agency kept the flaws from the software vendors, depriving them of a chance to patch their systems.




  • Passcode signs off

    Passcode signs offDear Passcode readers:




  • Why the airline 'electronics ban' may not be discrimination

    Why the airline 'electronics ban' may not be discriminationWhile policy's timing and targeted locations have raised eyebrows, the scholars who study terrorism aren't quite ready to equate the new policy – which bans any electronics larger than a cellphone from being carried on flights departing from 10 Middle Eastern airports – with discrimination. In their view, the "electronics ban" is consistent with how the US government has handled previous terrorist threats, and it may not stem from prejudice toward Muslims. “I think to immediately jump to the conclusion that this is connected with the travel ban is too far, too quick,” says Robert Pape, professor of political science at the University of Chicago who specializes in international security.




  • It's not just Norway – some developing countries are seeing gains in happiness index, too

    It's not just Norway – some developing countries are seeing gains in happiness index, tooThe World Happiness Report, an index that rates nations based on factors such as income and life expectancy, released its 2017 list Monday at the United Nations. The list doesn’t contain any surprises among the happiest or least happy nations, where Norway, Denmark, Switzerland, Iceland, and Finland rounded out the top and the Central African Republic, Syria, Tanzania, and Burundi came in among the bottom of the list.




  • With health-care vote, Republicans seek to prove they can get things done

    With health-care vote, Republicans seek to prove they can get things doneOn Tuesday morning, President Trump came to the basement conference room of House Republicans to do what he was supposedly born to do: Seal the deal. In this case, that meant lining up enough House votes to pass the GOP plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on Thursday. The North Carolinian opposes the GOP health-care bill.




  • Biden returns: What's next in the Obamacare fight?

    Biden returns: What's next in the Obamacare fight?In the eyes of some Democrats, he might be the hero the party deserves – and the hero it needs. Joining House minority leader Nancy Pelosi and other Democrats on the steps of the Capitol, an Obamacare rally will mark an unusually political start for a post-vice presidency. The Democratic leaders will gather on the front steps of the Capitol at 10 a.m. Wednesday in a joint celebration of Obamacare’s 7th anniversary and in protest of its potentially imminent repeal, according to Politico.




  • Martin McGuinness: How being honest about his IRA ties let him become a peacemaker

    Martin McGuinness: How being honest about his IRA ties let him become a peacemakerThis morning I awoke to the news that Martin McGuinness, the former first minister of Northern Ireland and a noted commander of the Irish Republican Army (IRA), had died. Although McGuinness nominally stood down as first minister in January of this year because a scandal had engulfed his coalition partner, the pro-British Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), he stated that for health reasons he would not himself be seeking re-election. Of course, as an IRA commander, McGuinness was a man who knew a thing or two about death.




  • Long a way station for refugees, immigrants, Mexico now playing host

    Long a way station for refugees, immigrants, Mexico now playing hostFive times over the past 14 years, Melvin, a young Honduran, attempted to cross the southern border of the United States. Five times, he was caught and deported back to Central America. Melvin and his family, who suffered death threats and extortion by local gangs in Honduras, applied for refugee status in Mexico, and are now awaiting the government’s response.




  • When ex-offenders deserve forgiveness on their records

    When ex-offenders deserve forgiveness on their recordsScholars who study forgiveness often say that it can benefit both the forgiver and the forgiven, assuming the forgiven has paid a price for his or her wrongdoing and shows contrition. Forgiveness, in other words, is a two-way street toward healing a relationship. The idea has now been put to the test in a research report on what is an increasingly popular type of government forgiveness: allowing many ex-offenders to control public knowledge of their past crime.




  • Youth opioid use has declined somewhat. What's behind the drop?

    Youth opioid use has declined somewhat. What's behind the drop?The rate of exposure to prescription opioids among children and teenagers in the United States dropped between 2009 and 2015, after a rapid increase in the early 2000s, a new study published on Monday shows. By looking at reports from the National Poison Data System over a 16-year period, a team of researchers at the University of Michigan found evidence that the US opioid epidemic has also extended to young children, as poison control centers across the country recorded an average of 32 calls a day from families for exposure incidents – which meant that, over that time period, somewhere in the US such a call was being made once approximately every 45 minutes.




  • Defeating ISIS: Is Trump administration ready for the long haul?

    Defeating ISIS: Is Trump administration ready for the long haul?Is it possible to defeat the Islamic State in a year? President Trump has directed the Pentagon to deliver plans to achieve that goal.




  • The Cybersecurity Podcast

    The Cybersecurity PodcastCybersecurity is not just about computers and digital processes. The most important, and most interesting, part of the story is the people behind the keyboard.




  • Why were Confederate battle flags flown during March Madness?

    Why were Confederate battle flags flown during March Madness?It has nothing to do with basketball, but an incident during NCAA March Madness games served as a reminder that the south still struggles with the complicated symbol that embodies the scars of the Civil War and modern racial tensions. The Confederate battle flag flew conspicuously over the parking garage for the South Carolina stadium hosting two NCAA March Madness basketball games on Sunday. A small group hoisted the large flag to protest the NCAA’s opposition to the symbol, which had resulted in a boycott of Greenville, S.C., as a game site since 2001.




  • Cinco de Mayo cancelled in Philadelphia amid immigration fears

    Cinco de Mayo cancelled in Philadelphia amid immigration fearsOrganizers of a prominent Mexican festival in Philadelphia have cancelled this year’s parade over concerns that immigration authorities could target attendees. Edgar Ramirez, one of the six organizers who decided unanimously to cancel it, told local station WCAU-TV that the decision was a “sad but responsible” one in light of the "severe conditions affecting the immigrant community,” citing recent large-scale immigration raids that include a roundup of 248 people in Pennsylvania and neighboring states this month. "We have people who travel all the way from Chicago, Connecticut and New York," Mr. Ramirez told the station.




  • Ivanka Trump gets West Wing office, access to classified information

    Ivanka Trump gets West Wing office, access to classified informationPresident Trump’s daughter, Ivanka Trump, will get an office in the White House’s West Wing, along with government-issued communications devices and access to classified information, giving new prominence to her background role as an advisor to the president. Ms. Trump, whose husband, Jared Kushner, also serves as a senior advisor to the president, will not be paid for her work nor will she receive an official title, according to Jamie Gorelick, an attorney and ethics adviser for Ivanka.




  • US Secretary of State Tillerson to skip meeting of NATO foreign ministers

    US Secretary of State Tillerson to skip meeting of NATO foreign ministersSecretary of State Rex Tillerson will skip a semi-annual NATO summit set for early April, in a rare no-show for the top diplomat from the country that serves as the alliance’s de facto leader. Mr. Tillerson will instead attend an overlapping two-day talk in Florida between President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping, leaving Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Tom Shannon to represent the United States at the NATO meeting, where European governments hold discussions on nuclear policy and strategic matters of high confidentiality. The month after the summit, Tillerson will attend a G7 meeting in Sicily, then travel to Moscow to meet with top diplomats from Russia, topping off a schedule that seems to underscore early signs of a radical shift in diplomacy under the Trump administration – one that has ruffled feathers with many old allies.




  • Legendary tomb of Jesus resurrected

    Legendary tomb of Jesus resurrectedBelieved by the devout to house the final resting place of Jesus Christ, Jerusalem’s Church of the Holy Sepulchre will open to the public on Wednesday after nearly a year of restoration. An ongoing dispute between the religious groups controlling the site had brought the burial place, known as the Edicule, to the brink of collapse. "We are at the critical moment for rehabilitating the Edicule," director of the restoration Antonia Moropoulou told National Geographic.




  • In Gorsuch hearings, questions of religious liberty and the law

    In Gorsuch hearings, questions of religious liberty and the lawOf all the people to speak on the first day of what promises to be a grueling week of hearings, Judge Neil Gorsuch – the man whose confirmation to the US Supreme Court is being deliberated – was notably concise. “In my childhood it was God and Byron White,” he said, referencing the former Supreme Court justice whom he clerked for. Indeed, “God and Byron White” could be a succinct description for the lines of inquiry Republicans and Democrats can be expected to take when the Senate Judiciary Committee begins questioning Judge Gorsuch Tuesday. As the minority, Democrats can't boycott him the way Senate Republicans did with Judge Merrick Garland, nominated by former President Obama.




  • In day of testimony, 'Russia problem' deepens for Trump White House

    In day of testimony, 'Russia problem' deepens for Trump White HouseRussia is a serious problem the White House can’t just tweet away. If nothing else, the Kremlin is probably pleased with its effort to sow discord and division in US politics, agreed FBI Director James Comey and National Security Agency Director Adm. Mike Rogers at the House Intelligence Committee hearing. “Absent some change in the dynamic, this is not likely to stop,” said Adm. Rogers of Russia’s multi-pronged effort to influence American elections.




  • Pope Francis asks forgiveness for Church's 'sins and failings' during Rwandan genocide

    Pope Francis asks forgiveness for Church's 'sins and failings' during Rwandan genocidePope Francis issued an apology to Rwanda on Monday for the "sins and failings of the Church" during the nation's 1994 genocide, saying he hoped the belated sentiment might help heal wounds as the country moves forward. During a meeting with Rwandan President Paul Kagame, Pope Francis for the first time blatantly acknowledged that Catholic officials have "succumbed to hatred and violence, betraying their own evangelical mission" during the genocide, according to a statement from the Vatican. Recommended: Think you know Africa?





 SfD Poll
SfD back online
don't care
great!
SfD what?
where have you been?
not needed
View Results

 Web Search
Google

 Calendar
Previous Month  March 2017  Next Month
S M T W T F S
      1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
 

Full Calendar

©2003-2016 Students for Democracy |  Site Launched: July 21, 2003

StudentsforDemocracy's validated RSS 2.0 feed

Warning: This text and the email address is not visible in a browser! Do not ever send any emails to:
dgtuuwti@contact.studentsfordemocracy.org